The Complete Father Brown Stories

The Complete Father Brown Stories

Book - 2006
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With an Introduction by David Stuart Davies. Father Brown, one of the most quirkily genial and lovable characters to emerge from English detective fiction, first made his appearance in The Innocence of Father Brown in 1911. That first collection of stories established G.K. Chesterton's kindly cleric in the front rank of eccentric sleuths. This complete collection contains all the favourite Father Brown stories, showing a quiet wit and compassion that has endeared him to many, whilst solving his mysteries by a mixture of imagination and a sympathetic worldliness in a totally believable manner. Stories include: The Blue Cross The Queer Feet The Flying Stars The Invisible Man The Honour of Israel Gow The Wrong Shape The Sins of Prince Saradine The Hammer of God The Eye of Apollo The Absence of Mr Glass and many more... AUTHOR: Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was an English writer, critic, playwright, historian and theologian. From his massive output of work, he is now remembered principally for his fifty-two short stories of Father Brown, the cleric turned detective.
Publisher: Ware : Wordsworth Editions, 2006, ©1992.
ISBN: 9781853260032
1853260037
Characteristics: 796 pages ;,20 cm.
Alternative Title: Father Brown.

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Liber_vermis
Oct 30, 2019

"Oh, I know well enough when I'm out of my depth; and I knew I should b, when I found we were hunting a fraudulent financier instead of an ordinary human murdered. ... Now murder's almost always human and personal; but modern theft has been allowed to become quite impersonal. It isn't only secret; it's anonymous; almost avowedly anonymous. ...But modern robbery takes the form of littering the world with paper and parchment, covered merely with written lawlessness. ... He was one of the modern magicians, he had a genius for finance; and his thefts were thefts from thousands of the poor. When he did cross a line (a pretty faint line in modern law), ... then the whole world would be against him. (p. 806, 807, 812)

"The vessel was just comfortable for two people; there was only room in it for necessities, and Flambeau had stocked it with such things as his special philosophy considered necessary. They reduced themselves, evidently, to four essentials: tins of salmon, if he should want to eat; loaded revolvers, if he should want to fight; a bottle of brandy, presumably in case he should faint; and a priest, presumably in case he should die."

t
Tabaqui
Jun 11, 2017

"Has it never struck you that a man who does next to nothing but hear men's real sins is not likely to be wholly unaware of human evil?" - Father Brown

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Tabaqui
Jun 11, 2017

"You see, I had murdered them all myself . . . I had planned out each of the crimes very carefully. I had thought out exactly how a thing like that could be done, and in what style or state of mind a man could really do it. And when I was quite sure that I felt exactly like the murderer myself, of course I knew who he was." - Father Brown

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Liber_vermis
Oct 30, 2019

I slogged my way through four stories before I gave up on this 800 page compendium. Chesterton writes in the over-wordy, flowery style of Dickens. As the excellent Introduction notes Father Brown solves the crimes by his sharp mental acuity and deduction powers which left this reader incredulous (and longing for more Holmesian forensic crime-solving). As the biography of Chesterton notes, at the front of this book, he was a convert to Catholicism so the ancient and violent conflict between Protestants and Catholics, in England, is a prominent sub-theme in these stories.

h
Happy_Reader_1825
May 04, 2019

I love these stories! As a fan of Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle and Jacqueline Winspear, I recently discovered - and now adore - these short, yet tightly plotted, mysteries. Note that the forward to this book is worth reading before diving into the stories as it gives you a deeper insight into Chesterton's life and his unique writing style. For example, not every aspect of the mystery will be 100% explained. On the flip side, you may learn more about human nature in one of these short tales (i.e. The Hammer of God) than by taking a psychology class. And, none of the great mystery writers ever explain everything to us. Also, if you've watched "Father Brown" on Netflix, that series is not very true to the books, so the actual stories will be fresh to you as a reader. There's also a great dramatized audio version - which is true to the books! - on the Libby library app. Lastly, these stories make for a great book club discussion, since each one delves into human nature. And your book club members won't have any excuse for not doing the assigned reading because they are each under 12 pages. :) :) Let yourself be taken away on the joyride these tales can offer!

t
Tabaqui
Jun 11, 2017

If you're looking for well written mysteries with a glimpse into human nature and a detective who isn't annoying, you've come to the right book. Father Brown is the most unlikely person to solve where he left his umbrella, let alone who murdered the victim. However, this little priest has much more to him than you'd guess. Later on in the compilation, you'll come across a discussion of his method. It is fully unique from any other! I quite enjoyed this collection, but I wouldn't recommend reading the whole thing in one sitting. Besides the length, there's just something depressing about reading a lot of murder mysteries in a row.

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