Little Women certainly deserves to be called a classic. As Louisa May Alcott tells the stories of this fictional family, of these four sisters growing up together, it seems so real. She based some of the stories off of her own life, and it shows. The writing is excellent, the narrative compelling, and the development of the characters realistic. The bonds between these sisters are explored, stretched, and redefined as they grow into young women and find their own ways through life. Each sister is different, and each of their journeys reflect it. From Meg's engagement to Jo's writing, from Beth's love of her family to Amy's art, each sister forges her own path, which is a powerful message to the women and girls of today.

Though some may say that this book is dated due to its portrayal of what a woman should be, I would argue that this book shows that the push for equality is older than what some people may think. Jo's own struggle for independence as a female writer in a male-dominated industry is proof that women have been fighting for themselves for many decades, dare I say centuries. The views portrayed by Marmee were very advanced for this time, and, though people might disagree with some of the more antiquated beliefs, the fact that she speaks up for women in her own day should be commended.

I would suggest this book to anybody, male or female. It shows us a world that few think of, and it does it in a believable, realistic way, dipping into the lives of four beautiful girls and allowing us to watch them as they shed their childhoods and grow into even more lovely women.

CASSIE ERIN MAUL's rating:
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